npressfetimg-414.png

Motor sports: Slot car racing helps pass offseason from local tracks – Kennebec Journal & Morning Sentinel

AUGUSTA — In a corner room of the Augusta Civic Center on Saturday afternoon, a group of approximately 50 people gather around a miniature racetrack.

One by one, 31 different racers take turns driving an electronic race car around the track, setting up its position for a race later in the day. While waiting for a chance to qualify, drivers and crew members work on cars at side tables, sanding down paint, fixing a tire, preparing for the car’s next run.

Welcome to slot car racing. It’s a hobby, but it’s closer to real auto racing than you may think. The gathering was for the Pro Stock Invitational, which was part of the 33rd Northeast Motorsports Expo.

“(Slot car racing) is basically just like strapping into a regular race car, only you’re driving it with your hands instead of your foot,” said Jeff Martel of Biddeford, the promoter of the Pro Stock Invitational.

Slot car racing is a hobby that began in the 1960s. Slot cars are miniature race vehicles, powered by an electric motor, with a pin attached to the bottom of the car that keeps it in place along a grooved track. The cars are controlled by a remote trigger, plugged into the side of the track. Though a pin holds the car to the track, it is not difficult for a car to get out of control, disconnect from the groove and crash into a wall.

“It was really big in the ’60s,” said Martel, who first got into the racing of slot cars in 1990. “It was more commercial back then, you could run a spot for cheap money (for a race). Today, it’s unfathomable to even try to even think about renting a spot. I did it for five years, and it just kept getting expensive. Now, 100% of the (slot car) tracks in the state are in the garage.”

It’s also a hobby that can be enjoyed by all ages.

“I’ve been doing it for a year,” said Karson Hewins, 11, of Oxford. “My dad has been talking about it. We’ve been racing down at Minot (Mountain Raceway) and he got into it. One day, I asked him if I could try it. He got me (a slot car), and I just got addicted.”

For 8-year Jase Martel, Jeff’s son, it’s a hobby he’s seen since birth.

“He’s been doing it since I’ve been born,” Jase Martel said. “I’ve been racing for a year and a half, two years. I’m getting the rhythm of how to do it. You have to let off (the throttle) before the corners. … I’ve been trying to get better and trying to stay up with my dad, because he’s been doing it for 35 years. I’m just trying to keep up and get better.”

Participants of the Pro Stock Invitational traveled from all over New England, as far south as Rhode Island.

“I’ve been doing this for 35 years or so,” said Kevin Boucher, 51, of Rehoboth, Massachusetts. “…….

Source: https://www.centralmaine.com/2022/01/08/motor-sports-slot-car-racing-helps-pass-offseason-from-local-tracks/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Releated

npressfetimg-539.png

NASCAR’s Symmetrical Next Gen Cars Are Getting Skewed In Practice – Jalopnik

NASCAR’s newest Next Gen cars may be designed to make these vehicles as symmetrical as possible, but some teams have already found a way around the rules. During this week’s test session at Daytona International Speedway, some cars have been running some fairly excessive skew — and right now, it could very well be totally legal.

Basically, skew refers to the angled nature of the NASCAR Cup Series car. The front end looks like it’s pointing in a different direction than the car is actually going, which gives the whole thing a sort of crab-walk look. The rear axle is mounted on a skew when compared to the whole chassis. For…….

npressfetimg-538.png

Is Norway the future of cars? – Kathimerini English Edition

The speed by which electric vehicles have taken over Norway has stunned even the cars’ enthusiasts. [Asya Demidova/The New York Times]

Last year, Norway reached a milestone. Only about 8% of new cars sold in the country ran purely on conventional gasoline or diesel fuel. Two-thirds of new cars sold were electric, and most of the rest were electric-and-gasoline hybrids.

For years, Norway has been the world leader in shifting away from traditional cars, thanks to government benefits that made electric vehicles far more affordable and offered extras like letting electric car owners skip some fees for parking and toll roads.

Still, electric car enthusiasts are stunne…….